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- Protecting Fabric from the Sun - Poly-Spray

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Why do I need to be concerned about protecting my fabric from the sun?

How do I protect the fabric?

I have heard the term "silver coats". What does that refer to?

I notice when I receive my Poly-Spray that it seems to have all of the pigment settled on the bottom of the can. Is this a problem?

How much Poly-Spray will I need for my airplane?

I have had my Poly-Spray sitting on the shelf for over 3 years. Is it any good?

Should I thin Poly-Spray prior to spraying it on?

What about cleaning the fabric before applying Poly-Spray?

I notice that when I sprayed on the first coat of Poly-Spray I see a lot of imperfections that I did not see earlier. Why is that?

What about using a chemical UV blocker in my topcoat instead of Poly-Spray? Won't that save weight?

By the way, how much weight will Poly-Spray add to the surface of a typical airplane?

When should I sand Poly-Spray?

Where should I sand?

How many more coats should I apply after sanding?

I had to stop working on my project after putting one coat of Poly-Spray on the surface. I have done nothing for 6 months. What should I do before I spray on any more coats?

My Poly-Spray dried real rough to the touch. What is the problem?

What about spraying on a cold or hot day?

The edges of my finishing tapes are curling up as soon as I spray on Poly-Spray. What should I do?

I am beginning to see pinholes as I spray Poly-Spray. What should I do?

 

Why do I need to be concerned about protecting my fabric from the sun?
>The ultra-violet rays of the sun will deteriorate any fabric within a short period of time. Left unprotected, polyester fabric will lose 85% of its strength within 1 year.

How do I protect the fabric?
>The best blocking agent against the ultra violet rays of the sun is aluminum pigment. We take the same formulation of Poly-Brush and add aluminum pigment to it. It sprays on just like the spray coats of Poly-Brush.

I have heard the term "silver coats". What does that refer to?
>Silver is another term for the Poly-Spray coats. Some people refer to the aluminum coats as silver coats.

I notice when I receive my Poly-Spray that it seems to have all of the pigment settled on the bottom of the can. Is this a problem?
>This is a very definite problem. You must thoroughly mix the pigment into solution. If you do not do this you will not have adequate protection from the sun. The best method is to take Poly-Spray cans to a local paint store and have them shake them. Even then, just prior to mixing and spraying you should thoroughly stir.

How much Poly-Spray will I need for my airplane?
>An estimate is provided in the Poly-Fiber covering manual. You will want to spray on a minimum of 3 cross coats to ensure protection. Coverage of 1 gallon is approximately 200 square feet per gallon.

I have had my Poly-Spray sitting on the shelf for over 3 years. Is it any good?
>The shelf life of Poly-Spray is at least 4 years. However, remember that the pigment will continue to settle with time. You must completely mix the pigment.

Should I thin Poly-Spray prior to spraying it on?
>Yes. Thin it 1 part of reducer to 4 parts of Poly-Spray. Use either R75-75 Reducer or R8500 depending upon the temperature.

What about cleaning the fabric before applying Poly-Spray?
>You must clean the fabric before applying the Poly-Spray. Clean it completely using C2210 Paint Cleaning Solvent. Wipe it off with this chemical and then a final wipe using a tack cloth.

I notice that when I sprayed on the first coat of Poly-Spray I see a lot of imperfections that I did not see earlier. Why is that?
>Poly-Spray will bring out all of the imperfections. This is because of the darker color over the Poly-Brush. In addition to protecting the fabric, Poly-Spray provides a good, sandable fill coat for the topcoats that will follow.

What about using a chemical UV blocker in my topcoat instead of Poly-Spray? Won't that save weight?
>You will save weight at the expense of not completely protecting the fabric. UV blockers are not as effective as aluminum pigment.

By the way, how much weight will Poly-Spray add to the surface of a typical airplane?
>The short answer is not much. A typical J-3 Cub covered in Grade A cotton with dope chemicals will have a total weight of fabric and chemicals of 75 pounds. The Poly-Fiber system, with 3 coats of Poly-Spray weighs in at 45 pounds.

When should I sand Poly-Spray?
>Spray on two full cross coats, let it dry overnight and then sand. Start sanding with 280 grit sandpaper and go to 320 grit sandpaper. You will wet sand. Do not dry sand. Remember to stay off rib lacing areas, etc. when sanding. Dip your sandpaper into a bucket of water and begin sanding. Be sure to wash off all sanding residue and let the surface dry before applying the next coat.

Where should I sand?
>This is a good question. You must be careful where you sand. Sand only in large, open areas and along the pinked edges of tapes. Don't sand over rivet heads, sharp areas, etc. You will sand through the fabric.

How many more coats should I apply after sanding?
>One more cross coat is usually sufficient. You can check this out by holding a 60 watt light bulb (protected by a small cage) up to the fabric. Look through a cut out inspection hold and see if the light is blocked. If you can see the light you need an additional coat of Poly-Spray.

I had to stop working on my project after putting one coat of Poly-Spray on the surface. I have done nothing for 6 months. What should I do before I spray on any more coats?
>You should lightly sand the Poly-Spray using 400 grit sandpaper. Then wash the surface with Poly-Fiber 310 cleaner diluted in 20 parts of water. Let it dry and then spray a light coat of R65-75 Reducer over the entire surface to soften it.

My Poly-Spray dried real rough to the touch. What is the problem?
>Poly-Spray should dry with a smooth, semi-gloss texture. If it is rough it is because the chemical dried before it contacted the surface. This is known as "blushing". First of all, be sure you are thinning the Poly-Spray properly. Move the spray gun a little closer to the surface. You may have to add a blush retarder (BR-8600) to the Poly-Spray. That will slow the drying process.

What about spraying on a cold or hot day?
>Do not spray in temperatures below 60 degrees F. If the temperature is above 90 degrees F, you will have to use retarder or wait until a cooler day.

The edges of my finishing tapes are curling up as soon as I spray on Poly-Spray. What should I do?
>You must be careful when fixing this problem. The edges of tapes should have been ironed down after the Poly-Brush was applied. Now you must be careful smoothing them. Use an iron calibrated at 225 degrees F along with a piece of tinfoil as an ironing shield. Do not touch the iron directly to the Poly-Spray. It will leave unsightly marks.

I am beginning to see pinholes as I spray Poly-Spray. What should I do?
>This problem is created when solvents collect in unfilled fabric weave. And then escape by causing a small blister. If the weave has been properly filled during the Poly-Brush stages, this will not be a problem. You must fill these voids. You can do this only by using Poly-Brush. Mix 3 parts of Poly-Brush to 1 part of reducer and then add 2 ounces of retarder per quart. Sand the blisters to open the tops of the pinholes. Brush the Poly-Brush into the pinhole areas. Spraying will not work.
 

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